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  1. #1
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    Default capicitor wiring

    guiting ready to change pickups and re wire my les paul. in most wiring diagrams i c the cap goes in between the tone and volume pot. however, in the stock wiring the caps are only on the tone pot (from one pole to ground). what is the difference in tone between these two wirings?

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    If you currently are using the modern circuit, here are the effects that 50's wiring will have (quoted from Premier Guitar):

    The Gibson ‘50s wiring is sometimes also called "Vintage Wiring" or even "’50s Vintage Wiring," but it all refers to the same thing—the way Gibson wired up their electric guitars in the late ’50s, including the legendary ‘Burst Les Paul guitars as well as SGs and 335s of the era. Though it was forgotten for many decades, the method seems more popular now than ever before, garnering a lot of attention in forums and with plenty of myths and urban legends surrounding it.
    Electronically, there is nothing too special about this wiring. It simply connects the tone pot to the output of the volume pot (middle lug) instead of the input. So what is so special about it then, you ask? The ’50s wiring will have three major influences on your tone:
    1. The overall tone gets stronger and more transparent. It’s difficult to describe, but it’s more “in your face.” The tone of late-‘50s ‘Burst Les Pauls has been described as having a “bloom”—the way the notes open up after leaving the guitar—that is hard to achieve without this wiring.
    2. The typical treble loss that occurs when rolling back the volume is lessened and both the volume and tone controls react smoother and more evenly, without the typical hot spots. As a result, it’s easier to clean up an overdriven amp by simply rolling back the volume on your guitar a bit.
    3. The tone and the volume controls interact with each other in a way similar to some Fender tube amps. When you change the volume, the tone changes a little bit as well, and vice versa. It may feel strange in the beginning, but it doesn’t take long to get used to.


    Here's a more lengthy discussion:

    http://www.seymourduncan.com/tonefie...ing-bs-or-bfd/
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    Default

    thank you but what im searching for is more about the tonal difference between the two wirings above. both are 50s style but one has the caps in the ground of the tone pots and one has the caps between the volume and tone pots.

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    Actually the Duncan diagram on top is a typical modern wiring scheme for an Epiphone Les Paul. The bottom one is definitely 50's Gibson wiring. If you Google for differences between Epiphone wiring and 50s wiring, it's hard to find much comparing just the tone, as most are comparing switching out the pickups and electronics as well. I did find this:

    The difference is subtle but I find it very useful. It allows a wider range of control with the volume and tone controls. I bought a prewired kit from jonesyblues.com for my SGJ. It was more expensive than just buying the components and doing it myself but for me it was worth the extra money. It was a very simple install and the quality of the kit was excellent. I wouldn't go back to regular wiring. I'm considering doing it to my other guitars. If you play live at all it is a must for me. It just gives you a little more control over your sound.


    http://www.everythingsg.com/threads/50s-wiring.27511/
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    i was under the impression that 50s vs modern wiring had do to with which lugs you came of the tone pot to the volume pots.


    i dont see the cap being just on the tone pot for either

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    You are correct - in Gibson wiring, either vintage or modern, the caps go from tone pot to volume pot. The upper diagram you posted is not "modern gibson les paul wiring" It is used by Epiphone. I don't have any more time to spend on this, so I suggest you do the practical thing. Wire your guitar both ways and see what you think. My guess is that the Epiphone wiring is probably substandard.
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