Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19
  1. #11
    Friend of Leo
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Bethesda, MD
    Age
    63
    Posts
    783
    Thanks
    89
    Thanked 52 Times in 52 Posts

    Default

    Totally, Capt! Great soldering tips from you and everyone. Of course, if I did this often enough, I'd make it a habit.....:)

    Edit:

    I really think your soldering tips post could be made a sticky of some sort. I know I'll want to refer to it again in the future.

    Srini
    Last edited by Srini; 04-26-2015 at 11:48 AM.

  2. #12
    Fenderfied
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Western NC
    Posts
    5,430
    Thanks
    34
    Thanked 115 Times in 104 Posts

    Default

    Not sure if this has been mentioned... I just glanced thru.... with electrical components, always use ROSIN core solder, not ACID. The acid will remain in minute amounts and rot the wire or erode the connection.

    Capn, I'm sure you have "the touch" and are much more skilled than I am but I always prefer to apply the heat to the area to be soldered then apply the solder, rather than use the iron as a "solder delivery device"... I think you have a better chance of getting a cold joint by giving the flux time to evaporate before it gets to the joint to be soldered. And Stan mentioned "tinning" the wire. I find if you "tin" both sides of the connection-to-be, just a touch of heat will bond them without having to hold the wire, solder, and iron in position. "Tinning" means just heat the wire and apply solder to it. it doesn't take much- as soon as you see the wire start to "draw" in the solder, yer good. Same thing on the connection. A little heat; a little solder. Then touch them together and apply heat. You'll see the solder "flash' across the two, and Bobs yer Uncle; yer done.
    Bottle Rocket Scientist.....

  3. #13
    Friend of Leo
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Bethesda, MD
    Age
    63
    Posts
    783
    Thanks
    89
    Thanked 52 Times in 52 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by badxmpl View Post
    Not sure if this has been mentioned... I just glanced thru.... with electrical components, always use ROSIN core solder, not ACID. The acid will remain in minute amounts and rot the wire or erode the connection.

    Capn, I'm sure you have "the touch" and are much more skilled than I am but I always prefer to apply the heat to the area to be soldered then apply the solder, rather than use the iron as a "solder delivery device"... I think you have a better chance of getting a cold joint by giving the flux time to evaporate before it gets to the joint to be soldered. And Stan mentioned "tinning" the wire. I find if you "tin" both sides of the connection-to-be, just a touch of heat will bond them without having to hold the wire, solder, and iron in position. "Tinning" means just heat the wire and apply solder to it. it doesn't take much- as soon as you see the wire start to "draw" in the solder, yer good. Same thing on the connection. A little heat; a little solder. Then touch them together and apply heat. You'll see the solder "flash' across the two, and Bobs yer Uncle; yer done.
    Thanks - I just checked, and turns out I did use rosin core solder, whew!! Also, I read Capt's directions as essentially the same as yours, ie, NOT to use the iron as a "paint brush". He may have said to use the iron as a "heat delivery vehicle", which is what you're saying - I think!

    Srini

  4. #14
    Fenderfied
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    UK
    Age
    57
    Posts
    6,292
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 156 Times in 146 Posts

    Default

    You are both correct. I use the iron purely as the heat delivery device but you need to apply the heat with a clean & wet iron tip, so the heat is conducted properly and melts the surrounding area sufficiently (or heats a fresh bare wire sufficiently) prior to adding any new solder. The new solder is then only applied to the area in question (a melted pool of solder or a bare wire being tinned) and not to the iron itself.

    For example, when I tin a newly prepared wire, I first clean the tip of the hot iron on the wet sponge, then add a small drop of solder to the tip of the iron to "wet" it, then put the hot wet tip of the iron under the exposed end of the wire to heat it up. Once it's hot I then add fresh solder to the top of the wire (i.e not to the tip of the iron underneath it).

    The important thing is to use a clean wet iron to avoid a dry ash barrier forming on the tip of the iron, which prevents proper heat transfer and solder flow.

    Stan's method of 'touching' two tinned parts together with a hot iron is correct but you need to use a clean wet iron to be sure of perfect heat transfer to both components. I'll most often add a dab of fresh solder to the area at the same time to be sure (although this isn't essential in all cases if there's already plenty of solder flowing between both parts).
    Last edited by Captain Bb; 04-26-2015 at 03:44 PM.
    I'm a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma.

  5. #15
    Fender Lover
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Hudson Valley NY
    Posts
    1,365
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 40 Times in 35 Posts

    Default

    That's great! Congrats and I'm glad it worked out. Now you're ready for more future electronic endeavors!

  6. #16
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    'Caster County, Oregon, USA, Earth, Sol, The Milky Way
    Posts
    39,687
    Thanks
    217
    Thanked 300 Times in 289 Posts

    Default

    I love the smell of hot solder in the morning. It smells like victory.
    Some contend that rock 'n roll is bad for the body & bad for the soul
    Bad for the heart, bad for the mind, bad for the deaf & bad for the blind.
    It makes some men crazy and they talk like fools.
    Makes some men crazy and they start to drool.

  7. #17
    Fender Lover
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Hudson Valley NY
    Posts
    1,365
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 40 Times in 35 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SAguitar View Post
    I love the smell of hot solder in the morning. It smells like victory.

  8. #18
    Fender Deluxe
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    13,816
    Thanks
    149
    Thanked 367 Times in 329 Posts

    Default

    Using the iron to heat up metal enough to accept (melt) solder is the way it is done. The biggest challenge for me is heating the pot casing AND wire, both enough to melt solder, without frying the inner components of the pot. I have an adjustable solder station which allows me to use lower heat settings to solder wire to lugs, and then a much higher setting to solder to pot casings, at which time speed is of the essence.
    The Human Torch was denied a bank loan.

  9. #19
    Fenderfied
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    UK
    Age
    57
    Posts
    6,292
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 156 Times in 146 Posts

    Default

    The way I do it Mike is to tin an area on the pot casing first of all (I sometimes use a fine abrasive on the area to reveal the copper coated layer) and then tin the wire separarately. I then place the wire onto the tinned area of the pot and place the tip of the iron on top of the wire. That way it heats the wire first and the pot last as it fuses the solder together. As soon as I see the solder on the pot melt I add a small bit more and remove the iron immediately. That way the pot gets minimal heat treatment.

    I find one of these useful too for holding components in place: http://www.micromark.com/third-hand-...tion,9380.html
    Last edited by Captain Bb; 04-28-2015 at 06:41 AM.
    I'm a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

The words Fender®, Telecaster®, Stratocaster® and other Fender-owned brands, and the associated headstock designs, are registered trademarks of the Fender Musical Instruments Corporation.
FenderTalk is an independent, member supported forum and is not affiliated in anyway with the Fender Musical Instruments Corporation.


GearTalk Network



IMPORTANT:Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult! No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.



©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© FenderTalk.com 2010 All rights reserved.
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:57 AM.
vBulletin 4.0 skin by CompleteVB